Tag Archives: Authentic recipes

Fruity Friday…Rambutan Fruit.

Fruity Friday, Rambutan Fruit

Native to south-east Asia this lovely fruit has almost a soft silky feel when you touch it and looks very pretty. Similar to the Lychee,  Longan and mamoncillo fruits it has a sweet tasting grape-like flavour.

All the fruit stalls and the markets have lots of this pretty fruit it is being sold everywhere…Thais love their fresh fruit and this one is no exception…

It has a leathery red skin covered with soft, fleshy spires hence the name which means  “hairy.”

In Vietnam, it is called Chom Chom which means messy hair.

The peeled fruits can be eaten raw or cooked and are often used in fruit salads or made into a syrup to flavour whipped cream or cocktails.

Although grown all over Southeast Asia, Thailand is the largest producer.

The rambutan is made into jams, jellies or canned in syrup.

Rambutan contains diverse nutrients in modest amounts. Vitamin C, Calcium and iron.

Like many other fruits and vegetables, the skin has been used to treat dysentery or chronic fever. The leaves are also made into a paste by mashing the leaves, adding water and squeezing out the extract then applied to the forehead this paste is also a great hair conditioner.

Boiling the tree roots to make a tea is also used to treat fevers.

How to open it?

Pot your thumbnail into the skin and squeeze and turn the fruit the fleshy fruit will just pop out.

Rambutan Jam.

rambutan open fruit-2477586_1280

  • 3 cups of peeled and seeded Rambutan,
  • Juice of a large lemon
  • 2 1/2 cups of sugar.

Let’s Cook!

Blitz the Rambutan in the food processor …I leave mine a little chunky then put all ingredients in a pan. Bring to the boil and simmer on medium until the sugar has dissolved. Turn down and simmer 15-20 minutes until the mix has thickened. Make sure you don’t let the sugar caramelise.

Put in a sterilised bottle.

This is lovely instead of applesauce on meats.

N.B.  Make sure your fruit is very fresh or the jam will have a dusty taste..not nice at all.

Thai Chicken curry with rambutan.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb chicken breast cubed or sliced or boneless thighs
  • 1 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
  • 4 kaffir lime leaves, torn
  • 3 red Thai chillies cut diagonally
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, smashed, outer layers removed, and inner core thinly sliced
  • One 2-inch piece galangal root, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 8 rambutan
  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 12 small pineapple, peeled, cored, and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 12 cups coconut milk
  • 2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 2 tsp. palm sugar or light brown sugar
  • Coriander leaves, to garnish
  • Lime wedges, for serving
Let’s Cook!
Using a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic, lime leaves, chillies, lemongrass, and galangal with the turmeric until a coarse curry paste is formed.
Using a small knife, halve the rambutan and peel away their outer shell. Remove the soft flesh from the centre nut, avoiding the papery skin that surrounds it, and place the flesh in a bowl.
In a large saucepan, heat 1 tbsp of the oil over medium heat.
Add the pineapple, and cook, stirring, until slightly caramelized, about 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the pineapple to a plate.
Add the remaining 1 tbsp of oil to the pan, and then add the onions. Cook, stirring, until golden brown, 4 minutes. Add the curry paste, and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 2 minutes more.
Pour in the coconut milk and stock, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer, and cook, stirring, until reduced by half, about 20 minutes.
Stir in the chicken, and continue to simmer until the chicken is cooked through.
Add the reserved pineapple and rambutan, and cook until the fruit is warmed through, about 2 minutes.
Remove the curry from the heat, and stir in the fish sauce and palm sugar. Garnish with coriander and serve immediately with the lime wedges and rice.
Enjoy!
Rambutan Mojito.
rambutin mojito
Ingredients:
Syrup:
  • 7 oz Rambutan about 8/9 fruits
  • Half a cup of granulated sugar.

For cocktail:

  • 4 large mint leaves
  • A wedge of lime and a couple of slices.
  • 2 fl oz white rum
  • Sparkling water

To make the syrup peel the Rambutan over a bowl to catch any juices, cut the fruit off the pits being careful not to take off the papery skin we don’t want that in our cocktail do we?

In a small pan combine the sugar with half a cup of water bring to a rolling boil stirring until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat and set aside to cool down. When the syrup has cooled down puree with the Rambutan and any juices until it is smooth.

This puree will keep in the fridge for about 10 days…It is enough for about 8 cocktails.

To make the cocktail…combine 2 tbsp of the syrup in a glass with the mint leaves, squeeze in the lime and add the wedge then muddle gently to release the mint and lime oils. Add the rum and crushed ice and additional lime slices if req then add sparkling water to taste. Stir gently with a straw.

To make it extra special roll a peeled rambutan in sugar or a sugar and chilli mix and add to the edge of the glass.

Enjoy!

Have you come across this pretty little fruit?? Do you have any favourite recipes using this fruit?? If so I would love to hear from you in the comments x

Thank you for reading this post I do hope you enjoyed it and if you did please hit the share buttons xxx

Connect to Carol( Moi)

Blog: https://blondieaka.wordpress.com/

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

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Have a lovely weekend and stay safe xxx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Food and Cookery Column with Carol Taylor – Delicious #Duck and Sauces

Some lovely duck dishes and sauces for you…

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

This week Carol is bringing us some delicious ways to prepare Duck… I adore crispy duck and pancakes and cold on a salad.. I know you will enjoy Carol’s expertise and also some alternative sauces to serve with this bird…

Delicious Duck with Carol Taylor

Duck … Duck always conjures up pretty images and so many cartoon characters are ducks and we think of them as cute and funny…Well I do…

Growing up we didn’t eat very much duck my uncle sometimes used to bring one to my mum when he had been out on his nightly travels…I think it was called it poaching…But it was what many people did then and sometimes just to survive… I remember his pet ferrets scary, fierce little animals…

Then as the times progressed it was the Chinese duck pancakes a real treat for us and the occasional duck eggs … It has only…

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Cookery and Food Column with Carol Taylor – Thai Curry Pastes and #recipes

Authentic recipes for Thai Curry Pastes made from scratch 🙂 I hope you enjoy these recipes to make your own curry pastes …

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I hope you enjoy making these curry pastes All these recipes are authentic Thai recipes and very easy to make, most ingredients are available at most major stores or Asian shops around the world.

Thai Curry Pastes made from scratch.

Before we start Thai food is all about the TASTE those important flavours of sweet, sour, hot and salty so my advice always taste and taste again, start with less and taste you can always add you cannot take away.

I am lucky in that I can buy these pastes ready made from the local markets but I know only too well from when I lived in the UK that the ones I could buy were not quite the same and obviously have preservatives in them also Coconut milk always check that it is 100% as they are not always and will split when you cook your curry.

Once you…

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – The Cookery and Food Column with Carol Taylor – Lucious Lamb

Lamb a treat here and a welcome one…I hope you enjoy the recipes 🙂 xx

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

This week I am showcasing my favourite Lamb dishes… Lamb is not something we eat often hear as it is always imported, expensive and hard to get so a treat for us…

I dream of a nice roast Welsh spring lamb with jersey royals, fresh garden peas, mint sauce and then I wake up…

Lamb is best cooked until it is slightly pink in the middle a lovely recipe which I have not cooked for a very long time but was favourite when we were in the UK was lovely loin lamb chops grilled or pan fried until just cooked then I spread the chops with mint jelly and wrapped the chops in puff pastry. Cooked in the oven until the pastry is golden brown and cooked the lamb inside should then be perfect served with mash and steamed vegetables it makes a nice filling meal…To reduce the calories you…

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Food and Cookery Column with Carol Taylor – Delicious Warming Soup.

Once again, Sally has let me indulge my passion…Cooking… and as many of you still have snow and we have tropical storms( rainy season) and I have a cough from hell… I thought Soup would be ideal on so many levels…Enjoy!

Thank you, Sally, for the shout out for my cookery book…Timers on and FB notifications off and limiting myself to 5 a day and that is not fruit as per the excellent advice on The Apes reblog…Thank you, Chris 🙂 x

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delicious Warming Soup.

Soup can be eaten whatever the weather as a starter or as a snack and even as a main meal if it is a substantial one served with lots of fresh crusty bread.

I know that many of you are experiencing icy cold temperatures and even snow still so I thought that a few soups would be nice to help warm those tummies and hopefully help to keep away those nasty bugs and which are also easy to make.

For those of you who are experiencing warmer weather some soups as well as no matter what the weather I enjoy a bowl of soup…Don’t you???

Soup has gone through many revivals over the years I remember my mother making soup from chicken or turkey carcasses or as a treat we had Heinz tomato soup…

This saw an increase of packets and cans of soups of many varieties…

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Fruity Friday’s…The Tamarind

Fruity Friday's The Tamarind

I just don’t know where the time goes it’s Friday again and this week I am showcasing the lovely Tamarind…The Tamarind is very plentiful here and used in many Thai dishes …I love just eating the fruit it has quite a sour taste but I like it…It is sold in little packs here on the markets the seeds already removed or as a paste to add to food. It is also sold dried and sugared as a snack food and although sugared is still has quite a sour…taste…

This rather plain brown pods fruit does, however, have the capacity to elevate your food to something else.

Tamarind like many fruits and vegetables has a long history of healing and aiding stomach disorders and is used as a laxative.

Tamarind Preparations are used for fevers, sore throats, inflammation of joints and sunstroke. The leaves dried or boiled are made into poultices to help reduce swollen joints, sprains, boils, haemorrhoids and conjunctivitis.

Tamarind is also great as a marinade for meat as it breaks down and tenderises tougher cuts of meat. It is used to make jams and syrups it is also one of the secret ingredients of Lea & Perrins  Worcestershire sauce which is a fermented sauce which has many uses.

Great for smoothies a mango and tamarind smoothie is very nice it also has many other culinary uses.

This little dip is a recipe from Bali given to me by my grandson’s girlfriend it is very easy to make but made more special by the addition of tamarind. 

Called Rujak sauce it is lovely with mangoes.

  • Take 200 gm of palm sugar shaved.
  • 15 gm of tamarind flesh and 5 tbsp of water leave to infuse for 5 mins and then drain and keep the tamarind flavoured water.
  • 6 or more Thai chillies.
  • 1/4 tsp shrimp paste and 1/4tsp salt.

Blitz all these ingredients together and you have fiery little sauce.

It is hard for me to pick a favourite dish made with Tamarind this recipe for Beef Rendang is a recipe given to me by my friend Mamik and it is very nice the beef is amazing. It is also my go-to recipe if I want that special dish to impress although there are many ingredients and it has quite a long prep time it is so worth it and as I said earlier if I am having guests a really lovely dish. You can see how rich and flavoursome that meat looks and it tastes amazing…

beef rendang

Ingredients:

  • 2” Galangal
  • 2” Ginger
  • 1 kg beef (Bottom Round)
  • 1-litre  Coconut Milk (3 sm tins and made to one litre with water)
  • Grind together and put on one side, 1 tbsp Coriander seeds, 1 tsp Cumin seeds and 1 tsp white peppercorns.
  • 2 Star Anise.
  • Half cup toasted coconut (pound in pestle until oil is released and it looks like a paste.)
  • 1 Turmeric Leaf (Leave the leaf whole but tear side to stem along leaf) this releases the flavour.
  • 2 stems lemongrass crushed along the stem.
  • 2 Lime leaves.
  • Soak 1-2 tsp Tamarind pulp in a little water and set aside for later.

Curry Paste:

Blitz the next 4 ingredients together to make the curry paste.

  • 2cm Fresh Turmeric.
  • 10 Shallots
  • 5 Cloves Garlic
  • 10 large red chillies (de-seed if you want a milder curry)

Let’s Cook!

Cut the beef into large cubes.

Put a tbsp oil of your choice in a cooking pot (I use a wok). Add Curry paste, ground coriander seeds, cumin and white peppercorns plus add chopped ginger,turmeric and galangal stir for 5 mins, add beef and stir to combine. Add coconut milk/water mixture and stir to combine.

Slowly bring to a gentle simmer, add torn turmeric leaf, lemongrass and lime leaves and star anise.

Cover pan and cook until meat is tender at least 3 hrs on a low simmer, stirring occasionally.

Add the ground coconut paste about half hour before the end of the cooking time and also the tamarind liquid and this is when the magic happens and the taste goes from just another curry to something wonderful.

When the meat is cooked and tender remove the turmeric leaf and lemongrass stalks although if we are not eating the curry until the next day I leave them and remove them before we eat the curry.

This curry should traditionally have a very thick paste and is also best eaten the next day to allow the flavours to develop.

However, as Europeans prefer a thinner sauce you can choose not to reduce down as much.

Enjoy!

Another of my favourites is Miang Kham although I have made at home some markets sell all the little bits ready cut in bags with the sauce much easier and they taste just the same as much of the food sold on the markets here is made in home kitchens and brought to market…

miang-kham-1188212_1920

 

Ingredients: Filling:

  • 3/4 cup grated coconut (this is often available in the baking section of most supermarkets) if you are not as lucky as me and can buy from our local fresh markets.
  • 2 small limes, unpeeled (try to get limes with thin skin), cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons shallots, peeled and cut into small cubes
  • 6 tablespoons roasted peanuts
  • 6 tablespoons small dried shrimps
  • 4-5 fresh Thai chillies, cut into small slivers
  • 4 oz fresh ginger, peeled and cut into small cubes.

Ingredients: Sauce:

  • 1 tablespoon shrimp paste, roasted until fragrant
  • 2 oz fresh galangal, cut into slivers and roasted until fragrant (see note below)
  • 1/4 cup grated coconut, roasted in a low-heat oven until lightly brown
  • 4 oz small dried shrimps.
  • 2 oz shallots, peeled and coarsely cut
  • 1.5 teaspoons fresh ginger, sliced
  • 8 oz palm sugar (broken into small chunks)
  • 2 tablespoons table sugar
  • 1 tbsp tamarind soaked in 3 tbsp water for about 10 mins.
  • salt for seasoning

Let’s Cook!

The Sauce.

In a pestle and mortar, pound together the shallots and galangal until fine (note about galangal: it’s ok to use dried galangal as long as it’s placed in a dish of lukewarm water for a few minutes to reconstitute). Add roasted shrimp paste, ginger, coconut and dried shrimp, and continue pounding until smooth. Remove the mixture and place in a pot with 1.5 cups water. Bring to a boil over medium heat, add palm sugar and table sugar, then reduce heat and simmer, wait until reduced to 1 cup or a bit less. Add tamarind liquid. Taste, and adjust by adding a bit of salt. Remove from heat and transfer to a small bowl.

Wrapping Leaves

Your choice of what leaves to use is up to you. Some use lettuce or spinach leaves due to ready availability, but to get an authentic flavour you should use the fresh Betel Leaves.

To serve:

Roast the coconut in a low-heat oven until lightly brown. Spoon the roasted coconut into a serving plate. In separate small bowls, arrange each filling ingredient listed above. With a fresh wrapping leaf in hand, fold it once across the bottom then sideways to form a pocket. Place about 1 teaspoon toasted coconut in the leaf together with a small amount of each filling to create a bite-sized quantity. Spoon the sauce on top, pop in your mouth and enjoy!

Although this can be a little time-consuming to prepare it is well worth it.

Lastly a beautiful salad with a Tamarind Sauce.

Yum Takrai (Spicy Lemongrass Salad)

Lemon Grass-Authentic recipe-Thai food

Ingredients:

  • 15 stalks fresh lemongrass.
  • 14 cup finely chopped ginger
  • 2 tbsp. toasted cashews
  • 2 tbsp. whole dried shrimp
  • 12 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 12 tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2-1 12 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tbsp. whole dried shrimp, finely ground
  • 4-6 red Thai chillies stemmed and thinly sliced
  • 2 shallots, very thinly sliced lengthwise
  • 3 raw stemmed long beans, cut into 4″ pieces for garnish.

Let’s Cook!

Trim and slice lemon grass very finely. Transfer lemongrass slices to a medium bowl, separate rings with your fingers. Add ginger, cashews, shrimp, fish sauce, lime juice, sugar, ground shrimp, Thai chiles, and shallots, and toss well. Garnish with long beans. Serve on Banana Leaf or Betel Leaf as in my picture.
We also serve with a tamarind sauce made by combining 3 tbsp tamarind pulp with cup water in small pan, bring to boil and simmer 5 mins.
Remove from heat and stand 15 mins you can help break tamarind down with a spoon, strain through sieve extracting as much liquid as possible.
Add 2cm peeled finely chopped ginger and 2 cloves finely chopped garlic, 11/2 tbsp palm sugar,2 tsp fish sauce,1 tbsp chilli/garlic sauce and 1 tsp soy sauce to tamarind liquid. Bring to boil, simmer 5 mins.
Whisk 1 tbsp cornflour with little water whisk into sauce cook 1 min or until thickens.
Taste and adjust seasoning add more sugar if required.
Keeps in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one week.
Enjoy!

Thank you for reading this I hope you enjoyed it and found it helpful if you did please feel free to share……Thank you xxx

Connect to Carol( Moi)

 

Blog: https://blondieaka.wordpress.com/ Twitterhttps://twitter.com/TheRealCarolT

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/carol.taylor.1422

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Carol Taylor’s Food Column – Lemon Grass Chicken and Jamaican Chicken Wings

Time for my cookery column once again…Two completely different chicken recipes both delicious and a lovely recipe for Thai peanut sauce…I hope you enjoy!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I just love cooking with citrus fruits not only are they healthy but they add such a lovely zing to a dish don’t you think?

Today my dishes includes either Orange or Lemon and when I was thinking about this and don’t ask why because I haven’t a clue my brain just wanders at times and goes off on a tangent.

But the Children’s Nursery rhyme Oranges and Lemons, said the bells of St.Clements sprung to mind…Who remembers that? We used to play that game at parties and in the school playground…Did you?

Today I give you a recipe which was originally given to me by my friend Mamik who comes from Indonesia… she makes the most awesome Beef Rendang which I will share with you another day…

These chicken skewers are lovely and moist and making them on lemon grass skewers just enhances that lovely lemon flavour.

Lemon grass…

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